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Category Archives: human rights

The Economist: George Rupp on famine in east Africa

George Rupp on famine in east Africa

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Posted by on September 22, 2011 in Africa, human rights

 

Amnesty International Rallying Supporters

Maternal health is a human right for every woman. Yet the United States lacks a robust government response to this critical problem including the lack of nationally standardized protocols to address the leading causes of death in childbirth – or the inconsistent use of them. In addition, the number of deaths may be significantly understated because there is no federal requirement to report maternal deaths and data collection at the state level is insufficient.

Amnesty International Rallying Supporters Nationwide During May, Urging Congress to Act on Growing Maternal Health Care Crisis as New Figures Show Greater Risks Across Income Groups

Public Invited to Join Mother’s Day Card Campaign as United States Falls Behind 49 Other Countries in Rate of Maternal Deaths.

Amnesty International’s campaign focuses on passage of the Maternal Health Accountability Act (H.R.894), a bipartisan bill that promises a dramatic step forward to fight serious pregnancy complications and maternal deaths. The bipartisan bill responds to many of the serious concerns raised in Amnesty’s Deadly Delivery report. A briefing on the bill will take place in Congress on Wednesday, May 11, hosted by Reps. John Conyers (D-MI), the lead sponsor of the legislation. From April 29 to May 8, Amnesty International activists across the country will meet with 100 members of Congress seeking support for the legislation. There are currently 35 co-sponsors.

The Conyers bill would help establish maternal mortality review committees in every state to examine pregnancy-related deaths and identify ways to reduce deaths. The legislation would also help eliminate disparities in health care, risks and outcomes, and would improve data collection and research in order to reduce the frequency of severe maternal complications.

A follow up on Deadly Delivery.

 

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Save the Children’s 12th Annual Mothers Index

Save the Children’s 12th annual Mothers Index is released every year prior to Mother’s Day. The ranking analyzes the maternal and child indicators and other published information of 164 countries.

In the United States a women is seven times more likely than one in Italy or Ireland to die from pregnancy-related causes, and her risk of maternal death is 15 times that of a woman in Greece. And this before the old white men get their hands on power to destroy abortion and contraception funding, and sex education.

I could discuss Norway being the best place for a woman to spit out kids, but it’s probably more notable that Afghanistan is the worse. We haven’t helped ny putting back into power warlords who not only feel a woman’s place is in the home, but in the home illiterate and subservient with very few freedoms.

The US ranked 31st, largely because of that mortality rate I introduced this post with, the highest in any industrialized nation.

Be that as it may, there are simple things that industrialized nations can do to help women in their own countries and in third world countries. Most of these solutions are proven and cost-effective, they can save lives for just a few dollars a day.

The report in PDF is provided below, the link to the site itself is at the tip of the page.

 

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Malalai Joya’s Visa Denial

Malalai Joya was supposed to appear this weekend at St. Mary’s College of Maryland’s Colloquium on the Impact of War on Women Worldwide. She was scheduled to be in the country on a book tour promoting her book A WOMAN AMONG WARLORDS.

Known as the “most famous woman in Afghanistan,” dissident parliamentarian Malalai Joya returns to the United States and Canada, this time to share her new political memoir, A Woman Among Warlords: The Extraordinary Story of an Afghan Who Dared to Raise Her Voice.”

However, according to the Afghan Women’s Mission, one of the sponsors of her scheduled tour here, the United States denied her entry because ” she was unemployed and lived underground, DUH.

Joya lives faces the constant threat of death for having had the courage to speak up for women’s rights, where do they expect her to live. She was one of
TIME magazine’s 2010 100 most influential people in the world, categorized under “heros, though they did misconstrue much and the picture they painted of her was false, leaving out her struggle against the US / NATO’S occupation of her country, the death, destruction, and damage to women and children, that she says the occupation has caused.

ACTION ALERT: Four Things YOU Can Do About Malalai Joya’s Visa Denial

 
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Posted by on March 18, 2011 in Activism, human rights, Justice and Equality, war, Women

 

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International Women’s Day

The brave and historical speech of Malalai Joya in the LJ

Malalai Joya

Afghan politician and human rights campaigner who has shown phenomenal courage
via guardian.co.uk

 
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Posted by on March 8, 2011 in Activism, human rights, Women

 

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Sex Trafficking In The USA

Though I get weary of titles like Why Won’t the 2011 Super Bowl Committee Protect Kids from Rape?, they serve a purpose. This kind of thing doesn’t just happen in far off places, it happens right here in little ole America. The Super Bowl, evidently being a venue in which the demand for such is high.

While the Super Bowl is a time of celebration for football fans in America, it’s often a time of exploitation for trafficked children. Last year, traffickers from as far away as Hawaii brought underage girls to the Super Bowl in Miami, where adult men paid to rape them. This year is shaping up to be more of the same. That is, unless the Super Bowl XLV host committee is willing to stand up for kids in Dallas/Ft. Worth. Sadly, so far, they’re not.

read the rest via change.org

From the Documentary Playground, still being screened across the country

25 percent of the World’s Sex Tourists are from the United States and US citizens account for as much as 80 percent of South American sex tourist trade.

and….

Sexual exploitation of children is a problem that we tend to relegate to back-alley brothels in developing countries, the province of a particularly inhuman, and invariably foreign, criminal element. Such is the initial premise of Libby Spears’ sensitive investigation into the topic. But she quickly concludes that very little thrives on this planet without American capital, and the commercial child sex industry is certainly thriving. Spears intelligently traces the epidemic to its disparate, and decidedly domestic, roots—among them the way children are educated about sex, and the problem of raising awareness about a crime that inherently cannot be shown. Her cultural observations are couched in an ongoing mystery story: the search for Michelle, an American girl lost to the underbelly of childhood sexual exploitation who has yet to resurface a decade later.

The trailer can be viewed here.

 

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Satellite Sentinel Project

When celebrities are useful.

Satellite Sentinel Project

UN Dispatch: Why George Clooney Matters, Mark Leon Goldberg

 
 
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